English Language Tutorials - Support - all the way.
RSS Become a Fan

Recent Posts

8 Mistakes that Haunt Language Learners
Adjectives ending with -escent
You're Still Kidding!
You're kidding, aren't you!
In Defence of Good Language

Categories

General English articles
How to learn English
Learning Languages
Love your voice!
Tips for English learners.
powered by

My Blog

8 Mistakes that Haunt Language Learners

8 Mistakes that Haunt Language Learners

I did not write this article - but wish I had. It is a very clear and common-sense presentation about the mistakes that will hinder your language learning. It is a PowerPoint presentation which makes it different from what we normally put on our English Language Tutorials blog. Hope you enjoy it.




Adjectives ending with -escent

Sorry, but this lesson is definitely for advanced students only!!

Increase your vocabulary – adjectives ending with ‘-escent’

Some English adjectives are formed from the Latin wordcrescothat means I grow.

These are all adjectives that end with –escent. So, in general these words mean‘becoming or growing’.

So, for example, the wordobsoletemeans old, or out of fashion. The wordobsolescentmeans becoming old or becoming out of fashion.

Can you guess what the following words mean?

adolescent................

You're Still Kidding!

You're still kidding!

Sorry, no, I’m not!

There are many words in English that have letters that arenot pronounced.

For example, in the word ‘debt’ the ‘b’ is not said.

But some English words havetwo lettersthat are not said! This is very crazy!

One group of such words are words that have the letters ‘gh’ in them and neither of them is pronounced. (There is a reason for this - but to explain I would have to go back into the history of the English language - and you don't need to know that!!)

Fortunately, there are not too many of them.

You're kidding, aren't you!

You're kidding, aren't you!

No, I am not kidding. The English language pronounces some letters in four different ways! This is true with the sound that we have in the word hate or wait or weight or way.

One of the problems with English spelling is that we have 44 different sounds but only 26 letters in our alphabet. And some of the letters are not much help. For example, 'Q,q' is hardly ever used.

So this means that often we use different letters for the same sounds.

So, I have made four lists of words that have the same vowel pronunciation that you will probably already know –

In Defence of Good Language

This article is a thought-provoking analysis of the status of modern English. It is aimed at native speakers of English but also is relevant to those who are non-native but advanced users of English. Condensed from remarks given on December 19, 1989, at the presentation of the Thomas Cranmer Schools Prize, at St James’ church, Garlickhythe, London. Printed in the Reader’s Digest, December, 1993.

IN DEFENCE OF GOOD LANGUAGE

BY H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES

I would have liked to begin this speech with a ringing phrase from the King James Version of the Bible: “Hearken to my words.

Fluency in English

This article is not written by us but comes from the UK newspaper, the Manchester Guardian. It raises very important questions concerning unrealistic expectations of English learners' progress in the language. Lindsey
 
How many hours does it take to be fluent in English?ManchesterGuardian, 23 July, 2013
 
Published: 23rd Jul 2013 – Manchester Guardian
 
Immigrants are always being told by politicians to learn the language. But how long does it take to speak good English?
 

Assure; ensure; insure

Assure – ensure – insure – what’s the difference?
 
These three words – assure, ensure and insure – are often a headache for non-native speakers of English. Even native speakers of English sometimes get them wrong!
 
 
 
assureto tell someone that something is definitely true or something will definitely happen.
 
Iassureyou that I would not propose marriage to your daughter unless I intended looking after her and protecting her for her whole life.
 
Neville Chamberlain came back from Berlin in 1938 and

Those Weird French Words #2

 
Those weird French words! #2
 
The English language has two groups of French words.
 
There are those words that came into the language hundreds of years ago and became such a part of the language that everybody thinks that they have always been English words.
 
But there is another group that came into the English language fairly recently that still ‘look’ French and sometimes are pronounced in the French way.
 
There are hundreds of these words. If you are learning English it is hard enough to learn how to pronounce ‘native’ English words – then you are asked to learn how to pronounce French words as well!

World Voice Day 2013

 
World voice day – 2013
 
Have you ever noticed how a baby can cry for several hours and shows no signs of strain?(Not that I am suggesting that you should let a baby cry for such a long period of time.) But have you noticed that if an adult goes to a football match after, maybe, half an hour of shouting the voice is getting croaky and if the person is not careful he might not have a voice at all on the train or bus going home.What is the difference?
 
The difference is that the baby naturally uses correct breathing whereas the adult has learned bad habits.

Those weird French words!

Those weird French words!
 
 
TheEnglish languagehas two groups of French words.
 
There are those words that came into the language hundreds of years ago and became such a part of the language that everybody thinks that they have always been English words.
 
But there is another group that came into the English fairly recently that still ‘look’French and sometimes are pronounced in the French way.
 
There are hundreds of these words. If you are learning English it is hard enough to learn how to pronounce ‘native’ English words – then you are asked to learn how to pronounce French words as well!
Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint